IBIS Decaf

£8.50£27.00 inc. VAT or subscribe and save up to 20%

Clear

BODY

ACIDITY

SCA SCORE 87

Country: Colombia
Region: North/Central Huila
Altitude: 1600-1900 MASL
Variety: Castillo, Caturra
Process: Washed
Notes: Milk Chocolate, Caramel, Biscuit, Red currant

The Art of Production

Colombia Dulima is Excelso EP grades sourced from high altitudes in the Tolima and Huila growing regions. Half of every hand-selected lot is guaranteed screen 17/18 or higher. As an excellent single origin or a consistent blender, this fully washed coffee is smooth and clean, with a pointed acidity and good body. The spread of coffee planting throughout Colombia in the early 19th century is attributed to a priest who made coffee planting a penance for his parishioners. It worked. Colombia is among the largest producer of coffee in the world, and was number two behind Brazil for decades.

The region

Colombia Dulima is Excelso EP grades sourced from high altitudes in the Tolima and Huila growing regions. Half of every hand-selected lot is guaranteed screen 17/18 or higher. As an excellent single origin or a consistent blender, this fully washed coffee is smooth and clean, with a pointed acidity and good body. The spread of coffee planting throughout Colombia in the early 19th century is attributed to a priest who made coffee planting a penance for his parishioners. It worked. Colombia is among the largest producer of coffee in the world, and was number two behind Brazil for decades. The Tolima growing regions is named after the Tolima district, which was home to Pijaos people before the Spanish arrived. The Pijaos were known among the Spaniards as fierce defenders of their homeland, which they called Dulima.

Country: Kenya
Region: Kiambu
Producers: Kakindu Estate
Altitude: 1800m-2000m
Variety: SL28
Process: Honey
Notes: Molasses, passionfruit, treacle

The Art of Production

This is a honey processed lot, relatively unheard of for Kenyan coffee. Ripe cherries are carefully selected and floated in clean water to remove any immature or poorquality cherries, which float to the top of the tank. These top cherries are then de-pulped to remove the majority of the fruit, whilst retaining the sugary mucilage on the outside of the bean. The coffee is then placed straight onto raised African beds to dry in the sun for an average of 6 days. The parchment must be consistently turned to prevent over-fermentation, mould, or the clumping from the sugars drying on the bean. After the parchment reaches its optimum moisture content of 12.5% it is rested in a cool, dry environment prior to secondary processing (hulling, grading and hand-picking).

The region

Kiambu county is located just outside of Nairobi city. The region has a long history of coffee production and is famous for its large estates, which were originally built by British colonists in the early 20th century. After decolonisation, the estates were sold to local Kenyans who have been managing them since. While estates such as this used to produce the majority of Kenyan coffee, the increased urban sprawl from Nairobi, as well as the increasing land value in the region has meant that estate coffeeproduction has gradually diminished, while smallholder production elsewhere has increased. Nevertheless, estates such as Kakindu continue a legacy of many generations of coffee production, supported by unparalleled local knowledge and experience.

Country: Brazil
Region: Cerrado Mineiro
Altitude: 800-1350 MASL
Variety: Mundo Novo, Catuai
Process: Natural
Notes: Chocolate, Sugar cane, Nuts

The Art of Production

Coffee was first cultivated in Cerrado Mineiro in the 1970s by farmers from Paraná and São Paulo. Through a technique that corrects soil acidity (liming) and irrigation, large-scale cultivation has become possible. The region has around 4500 farmers cultivating a combined area of 210,000ha. The Cerrado Mineiro presents a dry climate during the harvest period, which causes the coffee to suffer less from humidity after harvesting, allowing for a consistent drying process. The region, which covers 55 municipalities in total, achieved the Denomination of Origin in 2013 and was the first region in the country to receive this recognition.

The region

Coffee was first cultivated in Cerrado Mineiro in the 1970s by farmers from Paraná and São Paulo. Through a technique that corrects soil acidity (liming) and irrigation, large-scale cultivation has become possible. The region has around 4500 farmers cultivating a combined area of 210,000ha. The Cerrado Mineiro presents a dry climate during the harvest period, which causes the coffee to suffer less from humidity after harvesting, allowing for a consistent drying process. The region, which covers 55 municipalities in total, achieved the Denomination of Origin in 2013 and was the first region in the country to receive this recognition.

Country: Guatemala
Region: Chimaltenango
Altitude: 1650-2200 MASL
Variety: Catuai, Caturra, Typica & Pache
Process: Washed
Notes: Braeburn apples, Milk chocolate, Double Cream

The Art of Production

Santos Emiliano Bautista López owns the 14.5-hectare farm San Emiliano, where there are 2.5 hectares planted with Bourbon, Caturra, and Catuai coffees. Coffee is picked ripe and depulped the following day before being fermented for 24 hours and washed three times. It's dried on patios. Despite its relatively small size, Guatemala’s coffee-producing regions have distinct regional profiles that are influenced primarily by varieties and microclimate. Café Imports primarily works in four of the main growing regions.

The region

Antigua has farms mostly between 1300–1600 meters, many situated on one of the three main volcanoes, called Agua, Fuego, and Acatenango. The volcanic soil helps lock in moisture, as the region is sunnier and tends to get less rainfall than elsewhere, and the coffees are sweet, smooth, and good for blending or as mild, lower-acid single-origin offerings. Followed by Atitlan has a very rich soil composition thanks to the volcanoes that surround Lake Atitlan. The windy and wet climate contribute to the nutty, chocolate characteristics that are balanced by a lemony acid and some florals.

Huehuetenango is probably the most famous region, and has the highest altitudes in the country, as high as 2,000 meters. Crisp malic and citrus acidity, full body, and toffee sweetness mark these coffees, which tend to be the most fruit-forward and can be the most complex of what Guatemala has to offer. Finally Nuevo Oriente is a small region to the eastern edge of the country, butting up against the Honduran border. Its climate is cloudier and rainier than some of the other regions, and therelatively stable temperatures and limited sunlight create a full-bodied coffee with loads of balance.

Country: Ethiopia
Region: Amhara, Western Gojam
Altitude: 1750 MASL
Process: Natural
Notes: Pineapple, Chocolate, Mango

The Art of Production

Ayehu Farm is a 500-hectare single estate situated at 1,750masl. This grade 1 lot is of the K7 varietal, atypical for Ethiopia but sometimes found in areas of Kenya and Tanzania. The coffee was dried slowly in the sun on raised African beds for 18 days, turned periodically to ensure even drying and prevent over-fermentation or mould formation.

The region

The emergence of the southern Ethiopian regions of Yirgacheffe and Sidamo as leading producers of speciality coffee has led to a forsaking of many of Ethiopia’s other growing regions. It’s difficult to argue with this paradigm shift when these coffees so consistently deliver in the cup.

But we have always been on the lookout for other opportunities. Ethiopia is a diverse, mountainous country with abundant potential for specialty coffee cultivation, and sometimes other traditional regions such as Harar, Djimmah or Kaffa re-enter the conversation and find their way onto roaster’s cupping tables and specialty coffee shops around the world. Nevertheless, Amhara in Ethiopia’s rugged North-West is a new one even for us.

Amhara, home to eponymous ethnic Amhara people, includes Lake Tana, Ethiopia’s largest body of water and the source of the Blue Nile river.

Country: Malawi
Region: Central Malawi
Mill: Chibula Washing Station
Variety: Chandragiri
Process: Fully washed
Notes: Lemon, green tea with a caramel finish

The Art of Production

Ripe cherries are floated to sort by density, with the highest quality cherries used for processing this lot. The cherries are depulped and then dry fermented for an average of 36 hours. The coffee is then thoroughly washed with fresh clean water and then soaked. The wet parchment is then dried on raised African beds for 7-10 days, or until the optimum moisture content has been reached.

The parchment is raked to ensure even drying, shaded during the hottest part of the day and covered in the evening and overnight to protect from moisture contamination.

The region

A farm in Kasungu was the birth place of the first president of Malawi, Kamazu Hastings Banda. The Kasungu National park the second largest in Malawi is 35 km East of Kasungu town, and is known for its elephant population. The Kamazu academy a picturesque private boarding school 25 Km away is described as the ‘Eton’ of Africa. The surrounding Communities are mainly involved in subsistence farming but the major cash crop in the region is tobacco.

The Art of Production

Los Papales follow a strict picking process reaching 94% or ripe cherries. This has been achieved after persistently training their pickers for many harvests. Luckily for them, due to their labour conditions and “pickers well-being” mind-set, their workers come back to Los Papales year after year, so their how-to-pick-ripe-cherry training efforts have been reduced drastically and quality has been sustained. Every day at 5am, pickers go up to the farm to start their daily activities, at midday they have a lunch break and then add, extra 3 hours of picking, taking advantage of the sunlight. Around 4pm, they gather at designated locations to weigh their day’s picking and then load a truck that will drive cherries back to the farm’s wet mill.

After pulping the cherries, coffee is put inside hermetically sealed barrels injected with Carbon Dioxide to remove Oxygen and allow for an anaerobic fermentation. After 72 hours drums are opened, and coffee is washed and taken to the raised beds. The drying process would last approximately 21 days until the coffee reaches 11% humidity. Dry cherries are bagged in Grainpro liners for a 21-day rest period.

The region

Jinotega is also called “Ciudad de las Brumas” (City of Fog in English), which is a perfect way to describe the region. You can experience many microclimates while driving through Jinotega, one could ask you: “Do you want rain? Just wait a minute”, because one minute it’s hot and dry and the next it’s cold and rainy. Coffee farms in Jinotega are blessed with this cool weather and the highest altitudes in Northern Nicaragua, which allows for a balanced ecosystem where coffee trees grow healthy andproduce top quality beans.

Country: Rwanda
Region: Nyamagabe District
Washing Station: Kigeme CWS
Altitude: 1700-2000 MASL
Variety: Bourbon
Process: Fully Washed
Notes: Lime, Oolong Tea, Raspberry ripple

The Art of Production

Processing begins when the farmers deliver their cherries to the mill for sorting. Immature and damaged cherries are removed by hand and then the remainder floated in 0an open water tank. The floating cherries (lower quality) are removed, and the cherries that sink are used for the highest quality coffees like this lot.

Selected cherries are pulped and then undergo 2 fermentation processes. First, an initial dry fermentation for 12-18 hours, followed by a wet fermentation - submerging the coffee to create more anaerobic conditions - for 24 to 36 hours. The enzymes present during this process break down the sugary mucilage on the outside of the bean, allowing for a clean washing process and contributing to the acidity and complexity of the final cup. Once the sugary mucilage has broken sufficiently the coffee is washed and graded in clean water channels, before being dried in the sun on raised African beds for an average of 12 to 18 days. The parchment must be carefully maintained to ensure an even drying and it is further protected from rain and hot sunshine. Once the optimum moisture content has been reached, the parchment is bagged and rested for 1-2 months in a cool, dry environment. After it has rested the coffee is transported to the capital of Kigali for hulling, grading and hand sorting, before being bagged in GrainPro for export.

The region

Kigeme Coffee Washing Station (CWS) is located near the village of Munombe in Nyamagabe district, in Rwanda’s Southern province. Like much of Rwanda, the region is very mountainous, with altitudes ranging up to 2,100masl. It is also rich in volcanic soil, supplied by the nearby Lake Kiuva, which caps a volcano that erupts approximately every 1,000 years.

FOLLOW US ON INSTAGRAM @SCARLETTCOFFEEROASTERY