BREW GUIDE

Espresso

STEP 1

Use a scale to measure your dose of coffee and brewed liquid.

STEP 2

Distribute the coffee evenly to ensure the bed of coffee is flat.

STEP 3

Tamp down the bed of coffee with 10-15 kg of pressure. Be sure to tamp level. This is more important than the pressure.

STEP 4

Adjust your grind size to have the full beverage weight in approximately 27 seconds. Extraction time is controlled by the grind setting, so it is worth experimenting with this. As you grind finer, you increase extraction time.

STEP 5

For a more balanced cup, we like to give the espresso a quick stir to mix the layers before drinking. Enjoy!

V60

STEP 1

Place the filter paper in the cone and boil your kettle. Aim for 93 degrees Celsius. On a conventional kettle turn it off when you first see bubbles rising from the bottom. Rinse the filter paper out with approx. 100ml of hot water. This washes any papery taste away and heats the brewing cone and server.

STEP 2

Add the coffee. You want to aim for a medium grind – like granulated sugar. Remember, the finer the grind the slower the extraction. Equally a coarser grind will speed up extraction. Start with a 60g of coffee to 1 litre of water brew ratio, so 12g per 200ml cup. Adjust this to suit your coffee. Very light roast coffees might need a bit more, and more developed coffees might need a little less. In this instance, we used 24g of coffee for 400ml of water.

STEP 3

Pre-infuse the coffee. Pour 10% of the water over the grounds in a circular motion. For example, we used a pre-infusion of 40ml. Wait 30 seconds for the coffee to “bloom”. This begins releasing the CO2 from the coffee and starts the extraction process.

STEP 4

Once all the coffee has dripped through agitate the brewed coffee a little and serve. You’re aiming for a total brew time (including the 30 secondpre-infusion) of around 3 minutes. This can vary and it’s a good idea to find the “sweet spot” for your coffee.

STEP 5

For a more balanced cup, we like to give the espresso a quick stir to mix the layers before drinking. Enjoy!

Moka Pot

STEP 1

Preheat the water. Bring kettle water to a boil and remove from heat. We do this to keep the temperature of the moka pot from getting too hot and cooking the coffee, imparting a metallic taste.

STEP 2

Grind your coffee on a drip coffee setting, about as fine as table salt. You need enough coffee to fill the filter basket, which is about 15 to 17 grams (or about 2.5 Tablespoons) for a 4-cup Bialetti moka pot.

STEP 3

Add the heated water and fill to the line in the bottom of the brewer.

STEP 4

Insert the filter basket into the brewer bottom.

STEP 5

Fill the basket with coffee, slightly mounded, and level the surface off with your finger. Brush away loose grounds on the top edge of the filter basket.

STEP 6

Screw the top and bottom together. Use hot pads and don’t over tighten.

STEP 7

Put the brewer on the stove, use moderate heat and make sure that the handle is not subjected to heat. Leave the top lid open.

STEP 8

The coffee will begin to come out and you will hear a puffing sound and see a rich-brown stream that will get progressively lighter in color. Once the stream is the color of yellow honey, remove from heat source with hot pads and close the lid.

STEP 9

Wrap the bottom of the pot in a chilled bar towel or run under cold tap water to stop extraction. We do this to prevent the coffee from developing a metallic taste. The idea here is to get a relatively small amount of coffee which is very concentrated and rich.

STEP 10

As soon as the coffee stops bubbling out, pour it into cups or a carafe. You may wish to dilute with hot water depending on preference.

French Press

STEP 1

Heat your water to 205 degrees by bringing it to a boil and letting it sit for 30 seconds.

STEP 2

Fill your French press about one-quarter full with hot water and press the plunger all the way down. Swirl the hot water around inside the French press for about 10 seconds, then pull the plunger up and remove the lid. Discard the rinse water.

STEP 3

If using pre-ground coffee skip to Step 4. Otherwise, weigh out your whole bean coffee and grind it on a coarse setting.

STEP 4

Pour your ground coffee into the French Press and gently shake it back and forth to settle the grounds.

STEP 5

Time: 0:00-0:30

Pour about half of your hot water evenly over the grounds. This step is called the bloom. Hot water forces the ground coffee to release trapped gases, leading to expansion of the coffee and wonderful aromas for you to enjoy. During the bloom, a thick “crust” of coffee grounds will also form.

Start your timer once you’ve finished pouring.

STEP 6

Time: 0:30-0:35

Once your timer hits 30 seconds, stir the coffee gently for 5 seconds to break up the crust and mix the grounds evenly with the water.

STEP 7

Time: 0:35-4:00

Pour the remaining half of your hot water over the coffee. Place the lid on your French press with the plunger pulled all the way up. Let the coffee steep until your timer reads 4:00.

STEP 8

Time: 4:00-4:15

Slowly press the plunger all the way down to filter the grounds from the coffee. Pour the coffee immediately into your mug – if it sits for too long in your French press it will turn bitter.

Chemex

STEP 1

Note: The amount of coffee and water varies depending on the type of coffee you are brewing and your preferred strength. As a starting point, we recommend using 50 grams of coffee and 700 grams of water (about 25 ounces), and then adjust according to your taste.

Weigh out the coffee and grind to a coarseness resembling sea salt.

STEP 2

Unfold your filter and place it in your Chemex, ensuring that the triple-fold portion is facing the pour spout and lays across without obstructing it.

STEP 3

Fully saturate the filter and warm the vessel with hot water. Discard this water through the pour spout.

STEP 4

Pour your ground coffee into the filter and give it a gentle shake. This will flatten the bed, allowing for a more-even pour.

STEP 5

There will be four pours total, and this is the first.

Starting at the bed’s center, gently pour twice the amount of water that you have coffee into your grounds (for example, 50 grams of water if you have 25 grams of coffee). Work your way gently outward, and avoid pouring down the sides of the filter. You’ll notice that adding this amount of water causes the coffee to expand, or “bloom.” Allow it to do so for 45–55 seconds. A solid bloom ensures even saturation.

STEP 6

Pour water in a circular pattern starting in the center. Spiral out toward the edge of the slurry before spiraling back toward the middle. Avoid pouring on the filter. Allow the water to drip through the grounds until the slurry drops 1 inch from the bottom of the filter. You should use about 200 grams of water for this pour.

STEP 7

Repeat the same pour pattern as in Step 6, adding water in 200-gram increments. Repeat once more, allowing the water to percolate through the grounds until the slurry drops 1 inch from the bottom of the filter before beginning the next pour.

STEP 8

Allow the water to drip through the grounds entirely.

STEP 9

The brew should have taken between 3.5–4.5 minutes. If the brew was too fast, consider using a finer grind or a slower pour rate next time. If the brew was too slow, consider using a coarser grind or a faster pour rate.

Turkish Coffee

STEP 1

Measure the amount of cold water you will need.

STEP 2

Place your pot of water on the stove and turn the heat to medium-high (just until the water heats up).

STEP 3

Add about 1-2 heaping tea spoons (or 1 tablespoon) of coffee per demitasse cup (3 oz). Do not stir it yet. Just let the coffee “float” on the surface because if you stir it now you might cause it to clump up.

STEP 4

Add sugar to taste. Do not stir it yet, Let the water warm up little bit as above.

STEP 5

When the coffee starts to sink into the water and the water is warm enough to dissolve your sugar, stir it several times and then turn down the heat to low. You should stir it several times, up until your brew starts to foam (you can also vigorously move your spoon side to side to encourage to start the foaming).

STEP 6

When you see the bubble “ring” forming on the surface, turn down the heat a little bit more or move your pot away from the heat source. Pay attention to the bubbles that are forming at this stage. Bubbles should be very small in size.

STEP 7

From this point on watch your brew carefully. Do not let the temperature get hot enough to start boiling. (NEVER LET IT BOIL – many instructions on how to make Turkish coffee use the term”boiling” but this is totally inaccurate) The key idea here is to let the coffee build a thick froth and that occurs approximately around 158 F or 70 C (i.e., much cooler than the boiling point of water which is 212 F or 100 C at standard pressure. If your brew comes to a boil, you will not have any foam because it will simply evaporate!).

STEP 8

Keep it at the “foaming” stage as long as you can without letting it come to a boil. You might even gently stir your brew a little bit at this stage. The more froth, the better it will taste. Also your coffee must be fresh or it will not foam as well. If your brew gets too hot and begins to “rise”, then move it away from the heat or just turn it down. You are almost done. Repeat this process until your foam has”raised” and “cooled” at the most couple of times(NOT 3-4 times like some instructions. Even once is enough). Then pour in to your cups (quickly at first to get out the foam, then slowly) while making sure that each cup has equal amount of foam! If you are serving several cups then you might be better off spooning the foam into each cup.

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